Mount Rainier National Park

TLDR: Hiked with my parents, had questionable weather, mom attacked by a dog, made the weekend fun anyway.

This weekend, my dad and I decided to meet up in Ashford and do a few hikes near Mount Rainier National Park. We ended up convincing my mom to join too, and we rented a very cute Airbnb about ten minutes away from the Paradise side entrance. The plan was to hike High Rock and either Comet Falls or Pinnacle Saddle on Saturday, then drive through Mount Rainier National Park on Sunday and stop at various viewpoints on the way to and from Paradise Inn. Of course, things don’t always (ever?) go the way you plan.

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Mount Pilchuck

The forecast said clear(ish) skies yesterday, so I made plans to check off a bucket list hike: Mount Pilchuck. Of course, this meant that the morning was full of cloudy skies and heavy rain. Despite being of the big names out here in the Pacific Northwest, Mount Pilchuck is far enough away from the city that it isn’t always overcrowded on the trail. The hike is less than 3 miles up, but comes with an elevation gain of almost 2500 feet and it has some of the most unique footpaths of any hike I’ve done so far.

The Drive There

The first five miles to the parking lot are very potholed and took a fair amount of maneuvering, although I’m sure a low clearance vehicle would be able to (slowly) make the drive up to the top. The last couple of miles are very well-paved and lead up to the gravel parking lot–there were only a handful of cars when we arrived around 8:30am.

Other things to note: This parking lot requires a Northwest Forest Pass, and it should be noted that there are no day passes available at the trailhead. The vault toilet at the parking lot is so clean!

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Ensign Peak – Salt Lake City

Here are some pictures from Ensign Peak, the very short 0.8-mile round trip hike up to the famous hill where Brigham Young and his crew surveyed the valley and made a plan for the city. From our Airbnb downtown, it was only about $8 to take a Lyft to the trailhead in a very residential neighborhood. It’s only a 350-foot elevation gain to the top, but since the trail starts at over 5000 feet elevation, you get pretty spectacular views of the valley below. Although there were quite a few people on the trail and enjoying the views from the top, it wasn’t overly crowded. It was a perfect place to see the sunset (and, had we stayed a couple more hours, I’m sure it would have been a great place to see the stars).

 

Colchuck Lake

Last weekend, I was able to spend the weekend in a tiny house with some great people near Leavenworth, WA. I won’t go too much in depth about tiny houses, but here are a couple of pictures!

The trail starts off with an easy walk through a dense forest. We passed some neat boulders along the side of the trail, and we were never too far from running water. About 1.5 miles in, we reached the first real bridge, which crossed over the creek in the picture below. After the bridge, the hike became noticeably more difficult and we stopped more often to drink water and catch our breath. When we reached the fork, we followed signage to Colchuck Lake–I will definitely come back to do Stuart Lake someday! The next bridge we crossed next was very narrow and led to a large hill made of boulders. At first we thought it was a scramble, but luckily the trail curves around the base of the rocks, along the water. Continue reading

Hamilton Mountain

I decided to try Meetup for the first time following my last (failed) attempt, when I ended up on the wrong hike. This time, I was going with a small group down to Beacon Rock State Park on the Washington side of the Columbia River Gorge. From our meeting point (transit parking at Tacoma’s Discount World), it took us about 3 hours to the trailhead parking lot. When we arrived around 9:30am, the first parking lot was already full. Luckily, there is a second, larger parking lot 0.1 miles up the hill from the first and we found many open spaces there. The road is well-paved and the parking lots are easy to access (and both have restrooms). Discover Passes are required to park in either of the two lots available near the start of the trail.

The start of the trail is wide and flat, and for about a mile it’s a very easy jaunt up to the turnoff for Hardy Falls. The trail down to the falls is steep and unfortunately, the falls were only a trickle this weekend–they might have been more impressive a month or so ago. Once back on the main trail, it’s a short distance to Rodney Falls and Pool of the Winds, which were much more unique. The Pool of the Winds (pictured here) requires you to climb up a rocky area at the fork, and there are guardrails for safety along the side of the edge. I saw several hikers debating whether or not they wanted to take the detour, and I made sure to let them know it was worth it (and that it was short!).

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Ira Springs Trail

I haven’t had a lot of time to hike over the past few months, so when a long weekend came around, I was more than a little excited to hit the trails. Since I was hiking this one alone, I decided to do a hike with fairly steady foot traffic and went with Ira Spring Trail, an out-and-back trek along the I-90 corridor. Recent trip reports indicated that I could leave my microspikes behind, and so I packed my bag with the usual: first aid kit/survival tools, an extra layer, water, snacks and my camera. I met a friend for breakfast before driving out to the Ira Spring trailhead, so I didn’t end up getting to the lot until after 10AM. A big thanks to all the people who worked on the road leading up to the trailhead–there were hardly any potholes, and it was a pretty smooth drive all the way up.  There were already too many cars in the lot, so I parked 0.3 miles up from the trailhead on the left/drop off side of the gravel road.

The trail from the parking lot starts off very flat and wide, an easy walk for over a mile. Almost a mile in, I crossed this waterfall, which apparently used to be a creek crossing before they built the bridge in the picture below. Had the bridge not been constructed, I doubt I would have attempted to cross on my own. Around 1.5 miles in, there’s a clear trail leading up where the “real” hiking begins. I was unprepared for the trail to be as relentlessly steep as it turned out to be! It actually reminded me of Mailbox Old Trail, albeit much more maintained. I leapfrogged with several groups of hikers on my way up, and many faster parties passed me on the long incline.

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Teneriffe Falls (Part Two)

Over a year ago, I hiked Teneriffe Falls for the first time and promised I would hike it again. Since my dad was visiting this past weekend, I decided to share with him one of my favorite waterfall hikes in Washington. Last week’s weather was such a nice reprieve from the dreary spring we’ve had so far, and my hopes were high that the forecast would be wrong about the weekend (it wasn’t). Luckily for us, we came prepared with layers and raincoats and arrived at the trailhead by 9:30am, where there were only around 10 cars. The new parking lot is one of the nicest I’ve seen, and has completely replaced the old lot, which has since been closed to the public.

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Bishop Peak – San Luis Obispo

Spring is here! I admit I’ve allowed an insane amount of time to pass without going out and hiking, but in my defense I haven’t had a free weekend in what seems like forever. Between skiing, going home to Oregon, catching up with friends, hosting family, and seeing the Olympics in Korea, I have been much too busy to hike over the past few months. Luckily, on my trip down to see my sister in California, we were able to squeeze in a trek up to Bishop Peak. While the out-and-back hike is only 3.4 miles long, it is quite steep and the peak is the tallest of San Luis Obispo’s Nine Sisters.

We started from the Foothill side of the peak, where we parked in a small dirt lot on the side of the road. A huge difference between hiking in the PNW and hiking Bishop Peak was that there were almost no trees. While we had a little shade closer to the middle and end of the trail, the California Oaks were significantly smaller and sparser than I am used to seeing on my hikes. We could see the top of the peak from the start of the hike, and made our way up the initial clearing and eventual switchbacks. The dry dirt path made it easy to slip, and I was amazed to see one brave hiker going barefoot down the trail.

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Little Si

This weekend, I finally made it out for a much-needed hike up Little Si. This was my second time doing this particular hike, and it hasn’t disappointed yet! I chose Little Si for a few reasons: it’s relatively short (coming in at a little under 5 miles round trip), the incline is enough to feel like a workout, and all the recent reports indicated the hike was still snow-free. We arrived at the trailhead around 9 AM and managed to snag one of the last 4-5 parking spots in the small, paved lot at the start of the trail (Note: this lot requires a Discover Pass, and the restrooms at the trailhead are still operational). The first section of this hike is steep, but is short and doable even for those somewhat new to hiking. Once the trail evens out, it’s an easy walk through dense forest and huge boulders.

We had a steady drizzle for the first hour or so, but the trees provided enough cover that we hardly needed our hoods. Luckily enough, the weather cleared up by the time we reached the end of the trail—the views at both the viewpoints were well-worth the last steep push. There were only a few other people when we arrived at the top, where we stopped to take pictures and eat. We didn’t use trekking poles on the way down, but for anyone who has issues with their hips or knees, I would highly recommend bringing them. We saw many more hikers on our way back to the parking lot, and when we got back to the trailhead around 11:30 AM, and the lot was completely full—it’s a popular all-season trail!

Icicle Gorge

We’re in December now, so of course I had to go on another snow hike this weekend. My friend and I packed our bags and headed off to Leavenworth for a couple of days to see the tree lighting and eat brats. Although we were certainly looking forward to enjoying the town, we were equally excited to explore Icicle Gorge, which is one of the more popular trails in the Leavenworth area. Since it was so cold and we wanted to be back in town by noon, we did the short version of this already-short hike, just going a mile out to the overlook and turning around from there. The Icicle Gorge trailhead was only 15 miles from our Airbnb, but it took much longer to drive to the parking lot than we expected–the 24° weather kept Icicle Road slick in places, and the last few miles to the trailhead were fairly bumpy. We saw two coyotes on the drive up, although they were skittish and ran quickly into the forest. Since there was only one car in the lot when we arrived around 9:30AM, we had the trail mostly to ourselves for the short hike. Continue reading